Health & Beauty

To Hoe Out Or Not To Hoe Out

With school starting up again, a recurring conversation needs to happen, to hoe out or not to hoe out. Even if you don’t plan on “hoeing out” or if you’re not even planning on having sex anytime soon, there are some things every person should take into consideration for whenever they’re ready to hookup, get down, or have sexual intercourse.

Consent plays a huge and the most important role in sex. Without consent from both participating parties you’re not having sex, no consent equals rape. If you need a brush up on consent, consent is the mutual agreement to have sex. Consensual sex means your partner can say at any time if they change their mind and so can you. It also means communicating through out and before sexual intercourse. Don’t assume something is okay with your partner, ask, talk about it. Minors cannot consent. People under the influence cannot consent. Someone who is unconscious cannot consent. The way someone is dressed, whether they’re flirting, relationship status and sexual activity are not consent or reasons to believe consent was given.

Another thing to thinking about when having sex. Are you practicing safe sex? Most adults young or older are generally aware of what a STD is, if you’re not, a STD is a sexually transmitted disease, most commonly spread by vaginal, anal or oral sex. Now that everyone knows what a STD is, you can learn about dealing with a STD, or more how to prevent having to deal with a STD. Although STDs are common, treatable and nothing to be ashamed about, they can be dangerous and not getting or spreading one is the game plan. Talking and learning about STDs have always been an uncomfortable and sticky conversation to navigate. Why is that? Most likely societal norms on sex, this leaves uneducated young adults to be the biggest prey to STDs. So what can you do to prevent STDs? Most websites when researching this topic tell you that a low body count can help your chances of not getting a STD. Not. true. You can have sex with 1 person and get a STD.

Safe sex is what is important, not your body count. Condoms and dental dams are very important tools in your safe sex adventure. Male and female condoms and dental damns are very accessible and an easy way to prevent STDs. You can find these means of Safe sex in many places, Rite aids, Planned Parenthood and if you’re on the embarrassed side, your local Spencer’s or Hot topic may have them as well. People performing any kind of oral sex that does not include a penis should be sure to educate themselves on dental damns. Talking to your partner is another way of preventing STDs, whether it’s having the conversation on the choice to get tested or asking if your significant other or sexual partner might have a STD. It’s very important and valid to have this conversation. There are no stigmas on having a STD but if you can prevent it you should always try.

Getting tested is very easy, painless and sometimes even free. Your local Planned Parenthood should be able to test you. Planned Parenthood’s website is an accessible and available to help you find information about your local Planned Parenthood, and STD testing. What if you already have a STD or you just recently found out you do? When dealing with the news of being diagnosed with a STD remember a couple of things:

  • Don’t slut shame, whether it being yourself, a friend or family member. Slut shaming is never the answer, it does not change anything. As well as is incorrect you can get a STD with a 2 body count or 30 body count.
  • Allow yourself to digest this information. Talk to you loved ones and experts about how you are feeling.
  • Lastly remember your STD is not your definitive trait. You are more than your STD. Remember to practice safe sex, have those hard conversations and look up Planned Parenthood website with any questions about sex, STDs, and reproductive health. It’s a great resource.

For more information, feel free to browse through Plannes Parenthoods’s website.

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